Buying used in Winnipeg gains popularity amid staggering inflation rates

There are few products or services left untouched by the rising costs of fuel and food, as Canada’s inflation rate hits its highest point in decades. In Winnipeg, that means people are searching for deals that others are happy to provide. Will Reimer reports.

There are few products or services left untouched by the rising costs of fuel and food, as Canada’s inflation rate hits its highest point in decades.

In Winnipeg, that means people are searching for deals that others are happy to provide.

“If I have a chance to save money, I’ll definitely do that. And if I have a chance to help save other people’s money, I’m all over doing that as well,” said Jeff Landry, business manager with Discount Tire Den in Headingley.

Read more:

Surging gas prices, Ukraine war pushed inflation to 6.7% in March: Statistics Canada

The business acquires bulk shipments of used tires from suppliers both locally and nationally, and, after an inspection, sells them for anywhere between 30 and 70 per cent lower than retail.

Jeff Landry, with Discount Tire Den in Headingley, says rising inflation coupled with pandemic-related supply chain disruptions have drastically increasing demand for used tires.

Jeff Landry, with Discount Tire Den in Headingley, says rising inflation coupled with pandemic-related supply chain disruptions have drastically increasing demand for used tires.

Will Reimer / Global News

“It’s great savings for everybody,” Landry said.

“The vast majority (of customers) is people off of Facebook and people visiting our website directly.”

Discount Tire Den sprung up in 2020, and in many ways couldn’t have come at a better time. The pandemic would soon produce a laundry list of shortages — including for tires — amid supply chain disruptions, which would then be followed by decades-high inflation.

Demand for used tires like these has climbed dramatically in recent months.

Demand for used tires like these has climbed dramatically in recent months.

Will Reimer / Global News

“A lot of people are like ‘I’ve never heard about you. This is a great idea.’ It’s a nice chance to save money because everything is going up in price,” Landry said.

Tires aren’t the only hot ticket items as people look to save a few bucks.

Read more:

How to save at the grocery store amid rising food prices

Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) thrift stores, which sell everything from furniture to clothing and housewares, by donation, have seen a boom in recent months.

“The combination of coming out of this COVID era and also having this increase in inflation has sort of created an interesting space in our thrift shops,” said Kristine Heinrichs, thrift coordinator for MCC Manitoba.

“Often shops are shortening hours but have an increase in shoppers, an increase in sales, (and) donations are higher than ever.”

That boost in donations serves a dual purpose, since not only do thrifty shoppers have a wider variety of items to choose from, but MCC uses the money to fund humanitarian work the world over.

Heinrichs adds their stores help bridge the gap between people who are in a position to give, and those looking to keep costs down.

“I think affordable products invite people to live beyond this moment,” Heinrichs said.

“They invite innovation and impactful lives that people can build for themselves and their communities.”

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

You May Also Like

Top Stories